Green Dot

Overview
Imagine a map covered with red dots. Each red dot on this map represents an act of violence (physical assault, sexual violence, stalking, bullying) – or a choice to tolerate‚ justify or perpetuate this violence.

A red dot is a rape – a red dot is a hit – a red dot is a threat – a red dot is an individual choice to do nothing in the face of a potentially high risk situation.

Violence on our campus is the accumulation of individual decisions, moments, values, and actions made by all of us. It’s hard to know exactly how many red dots are on our map at any given moment – but we do know there have been enough to create a culture that sustains unacceptable rates of power based personal violence against members of our community.

Violence is not limited to women, but impacts members of our community of all genders and every race, background, sexual orientation, religious, or political persuasion, socioeconomic status and ability.

Now imagine adding a green dot in the middle of all those red dots on your map. A green dot is any behavior‚ choice‚ word‚ or attitude that promotes safety for all our citizens and communicates utter intolerance for violence.

A GREEN DOT is:
  • pulling a friend out of a high risk situation
  • donating a few dollars to your local violence prevention provider
  • displaying an awareness poster in your room or office
  • putting a green dot message on twitter, Facebook or instagram (#LVCgreendot)
  • striking up a conversation with a friend or family member about how much this issue matters to you.
  • simply your individual choice at any given moment to make our campus safer

How many green dots will it take to outnumber the red dots and reducing violence? How many of us will have to do two or three or 10 dots to this map to begin to make a difference? Even though we don’t know the exact number‚ we do know this: there are far more people on this campus who don’t commit violence than those who do. If just some of us were willing to step up—even in small ways—green dots would very quickly take over the map—and less people would be hurt. Think about it. Will you do your green dot?

The power of Green Dot is simple: Red dots bad. Green dots good. You decide.

How to Get Involved:
  • Attend a Green Dot Overview Speech during the academic year
  • Register on Redbook and complete the Green Dot Training on Sept. 28th, 12–4 p.m. in Lynch 181.
  • Share your Green Dots on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram!