2009 Religion & Philosophy Speaker

A Conversation with Slavoj Zizek on “The Post-Human Condition”

The eminent Slovenian philosopher and charismatic cultural critic Slavoj Zizek, known as the “wild man of theory,” revealed the paradoxes that underlie our perceptions of reality when he spoke at Lebanon Valley College on Friday, November 6, 2009. Professor Zizek’s presentation was conducted as a public conversation with Dr. Jeff Robbins of the Religion and Philosophy Department. Professor Zizek is known as a “spellbinding” speaker due to his electric, eccentric personality and his encyclopedic grasp of political, philosophical, literary, artistic, cinematic, and pop cultural currents. The public conversation was part of LVC’s Wired Colloquium, which—in a yearlong series of lectures and presentations—examined how new technology, digital culture, and social networking has affected our lives.


Professor Zizek is a senior researcher at the Institute of Sociology in Slovenia and a professor at the European Graduate School. He has been a visiting professor at, among others, the University of Chicago, Columbia University, The London Consortium, Princeton University, The New School, the University of Minnesota, the University of California, Irvine and the University of Michigan. He is currently the International Director of the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities at Birkbeck, University of London and president of the Society for Theoretical Psychoanalysis.

He is the author of well over 50 books that have been translated into at least twenty different languages. He has been the subject of numerous book-length studies and three separate documentary films. In addition, he was recently named as one of the world’s 100 most influential public intellectuals.

In short, he is among the most sought after and exciting minds in the world today.

The presentation was a wide-ranging conversation that touched on the political, psychological, philosophical, and religious implications of new technology, digital culture, and social networking on the human condition.